#whitetowel – Match report and final thoughts

Tony Bellew beats David Haye!

Haye manages to land a right hand and remind the crowd that he is still dangerous, but a moment later he throws himself through a high left jab, misses, and falls to the floor. He gets to his feet but finally Bellew hits Haye down to the floor! He falls out of the ring and through the ropes, and tries to pull himself to his feet as the referee counts, but can barely get there. As he finally stands, his corner throw in the towel!

Loading...

Haye was crouched against the ropes as Bellew landed a left hand to the top of the head which finally put the 36-year-old down. The victor shakes off his promoter and trainer to embrace his opponent. A left hook to the side of the head was the final blow for Haye. Bellew said Haye’s physical ailments would catch up with him and he was proved right. Both fighters embrace at the end of the fight, Bellew knows he has taken out a sitting duck there. Haye feel through the ropes, and may have just got back up before the count but his corner threw in the towel. Bellew in tears. That is surely one of the biggest upsets in British boxing history.

Tony Bellew stopped a hobbling David Haye in the 11th round to ruin the former world champion’s return to the ring and shock the boxing world.

Bellew capitalised on Haye’s inability to move properly after he seemed to suffer a leg injury midway through the fight. Haye looked unbalanced and at times struggled to defend himself, but managed to hang in the fight despite hitting the canvas a number of times.

The Evertonian ground him down though and could eventually celebrate when Haye’s corner threw in the towel in the 11th round.

The buildup had been dominated by an ugly war of words but the fighters warmly embraced at the end of the bout.

Pre match reports

David Haye says he will provide “a real destruction job" against Tony Bellew on Saturday, who says he wants to win “by any means necessary".

The coming together of David Haye and Tony Bellew on the first day of their fight week went off without a hitch  in Liverpool, but the pair were kept apart by a sturdy phalanx of security men, most of whom were a good deal bigger than the two warring heavyweights.

Contrary to expectation, no steel fence was in place to keep the pair apart, five days before they meet at the O2 Arena in London in one of the most hateful grudge matches in British boxing history.

Leave a Comment